April 24, 2014

Flourtown Welcomes The Community for Fire Prevention Open House – Oct. 7

2013_NFPAPlease bring out the family to Flourtown Fire Company’s annual Fire Prevention Open House, Monday, October 7 from 6 – 8 PM. We’ll have food, demonstrations, and equipment tours of all we offer the community.

We also have some fire prevention tips for you, see you Monday night, we look forward to seeing you:

Cooking

  • Two out of every 5 home fires start in the kitchen.
  • Unattended cooking was a factor in 34%o of reported home cooking fires.
  • Two-thirds of home cooking fires started with ignition of food or other cooking materials.
  • Children under the age of 5 face a higher risk of non-fire burns associated with cooking than being burned in a cooking fire.

 

Heating

  • The leading factor contributing to heating fires was failure to clean, creosote from solid fueled heating equipment, primarily chimneys.
  • Portable or fixed space heaters were involved in one-third of home heating fires and four out of five home heating deaths
  • Half of home heating fire deaths resulted from fires caused by heating equipment too close to products that can burn, such as upholstered furniture, clothing, mattresses, or bedding
  • In recent years, heating has become the 2nd leading cause of home fires, fire deaths, and injuries.

 

Smoking Materials

  • During 2007-2011 smoking materials caused an estimated 17,900 home structure fires, resulting in 580 deaths, 1,280 injuries and $509 million in direct property damage
  • Sleep was a factor in one-third of the home smoking material fire deaths
  • Possible alcohol impairment was a factor in one in five of home smoking fire deaths

 

Smoke Alarms

  • Almost two-thirds of reported home fire deaths resulted from fires in homes with no smoke alarms or no working smoke alarms
  • Working smoke alarms cut the risk of dying in home fires in half
  • Hardwired alarms operated 92% of the time, while battery powered alarms operated 77% of the time

Info compiled by Flourtown Firefighter Jim Belcher via NFPA

Fire Safety: Holiday Fire Safety

Decorating homes and businesses is a long-standing tradition around the holiday season.  Unfortunately, these same decorations may increase your chances of fire.  Based on data from the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) and the U.S. Fire Administration (USFA), an estimated 250 home fires involving Christmas trees and another 170 home fires involving holiday lights and other decorative lighting occur each year.  Together, these fires resulted in 21 deaths and 43 injuries.

Following a few simple fire safety tips can keep electric lights, candles, and the ever popular Christmas tree from creating a tragedy.  Learn how to prevent a fire and what to do in case a fire starts in your home.  Make sure all exits are accessible and not blocked by decorations or trees.  Help ensure that you have a fire safe holiday season.

Christmas Trees

What’s a traditional Christmas morning scene without a beautifully decorated tree?  If your household includes a natural tree in its festivities, take to heart the sales person’s suggestion – “Keep the tree watered.”

Christmas trees account for hundreds of fires annually.  Typically, shorts in electrical lights or open flames from candles, lighters or matches start tree fires.  Well-watered trees are not a problem. A dry and neglected tree can be.

Selecting a Tree for the Holidays

Needles on fresh trees should be green and hard to pull back from the branches, and the needles should not break if the tree has been freshly cut.  The trunk should be sticky to the touch.  Old trees can be identified by bouncing the tree trunk on the ground.  If many needles fall off, the tree has been cut too long and, has probably dried out, and is a fire hazard.

Caring for Your Tree

Do not place your tree close to a heat source, including a fireplace or heat vent.  The heat will dry out the tree, causing it to be more easily ignited by heat, flame or sparks.  Be careful not to drop or flick cigarette ashes near a tree.  Do not put your live tree up too early or leave it up for longer than two weeks.  Keep the tree stand filled with water at all times.

Disposing of Your Tree

Never put tree branches or needles in a fireplace or wood-burning stove. When the tree becomes dry, discard it promptly.  The best way to dispose of your tree is by taking it to a recycling center or having it hauled away by a community pick-up service.

 

Holiday LightsMaintain Your Holiday Lights

Inspect holiday lights each year for frayed wires, bare spots, gaps in the insulation, broken or cracked sockets, and excessive kinking or wear before putting them up. Use only lighting listed by an approved testing laboratory.

Do Not Overload Electrical Outlets

Do not link more than three light strands, unless the directions indicate it is safe. Connect strings of lights to an extension cord before plugging the cord into the outlet. Make sure to periodically check the wires – they should not be warm to the touch.

Do not leave holiday lights on unattended!

Holiday DecorationsUse Only Nonflammable Decorations

All decorations should be nonflammable or flame-retardant and placed away from heat vents. If you are using a metallic or artificial tree, make sure it is flame retardant.

Do not Block Exits

Ensure that trees and other holiday decorations do not block an exit way. In the event of a fire, time is of the essence. A blocked entry/exit way puts you and your family at risk.

Never Put Wrapping Paper in the Fireplace

Wrapping paper in the fireplace can result in a very large fire, throwing off dangerous sparks and embers that may result in a chimney fire.

Candle CareAvoid Using Lit Candles

If you do use lit candles, make sure they are in stable holders and place them where they cannot be easily knocked down.

Never leave the house with candles burning.

Never Put Lit Candles on a Tree

Do not go near a Christmas tree with an open flame – candles, lighters or matches.

As in every season, have working smoke alarms installed on every level of your home, test them monthly and keep them clean and equipped with fresh batteries at all times. Know when and how to call for help, and remember to practice your home escape plan!

2012 Annual Fire Prevention Open House

 Flourtown Fire Company will hold its annual Fire Prevention Open House on:

Friday, October 5, 2012

6 PM – 8 PM

At the firehouse, 1526 Bethlehem Pike, Flourtown, PA 19031

Scooby Doo, along with all your volunteer firefighter and fire police will be on hand to demonstrate equipment, answer questions and discuss how your family can practice fire safety.


The reality is that when fire strikes, your home could be engulfed in smoke and flames in just a few minutes.

It is important to have a home fire escape plan that prepares your family to think fast and get out quickly when the smoke alarm sounds. What if your first escape route is blocked by smoke or flames? That’s why having two ways out is such a key part of your plan. This year’s theme,“Have 2 Ways Out!”, focuses on the importance of fire escape planning and practice.

Please join us for this annual event with the community, for more information on fire prevention see www.fpw.org

Fire Extinguisher Techniques

A portable fire extinguisher can save lives and property by putting out a small fire or containing it until the fire company arrives; but portable extinguishers have limitations. Because fire grows and spreads so rapidly, the number one priority for residents is to get out safely.

Safety Tips: 

  • Use a portable extinguisher when the fire is confined to a small area, such as a wastebasket, and is not growing; everyone has exited the building; someone has called the fire company; and the room is not filled with smoke
  • To operate a fire extinguisher, remember the word PASS

-Pull the pin. Hold the extinguisher with the nozzle pointing away from you, and release the locking mechanism.

-Aim low. Point the extinguisher at the base of the fire.

-Squeeze the lever slowly and evenly.

-Sweep the nozzle from side-to-side.

  • For the home, select a multi-purpose extinguisher that is large enough to put out a small fire
  • Read the instructions that come with the extinguisher and become familiar with its parts and operation before a fire breaks out. Local fire departments or fire equipment distributors offer hands- on fire extinguisher trainings.
  • Install fire extinguishers close to an exit
  • Fire extinguishers are one element of a fire response plan, but the primary element is safe escape. Every household and business should have a fire escape plan and working smoke detectors

Source: NFPA

Information compiled by firefighter Jim Belcher 

Grilling and Campfires Fire Safety

 

Every year Americans look forward to summer vacations, camping, family reunions, picnics, and the Fourth of July. Summertime, however, also brings fires and injuries due to outdoor cooking and recreational fires. Annually, there are almost 3,800 Americans injured by gas or charcoal grill fires.(Source: CPSC)

 

Summertime should be a time of fun and making happy memories. Knowing a few fire safety tips and following safety instructions will help everyone have a safe summer.

 

Residential Grill Fire Facts

  • An estimated 5,700 grill fires occur on residential properties each year in the United States.
  • Almost half (49 percent) of grill fires on residential properties occur from 5 to 8 p.m.
  • Over half (57 percent) of grill fires on residential properties occur in the 4 months of May, June, July, and August.
  • Thirty-two percent of grill fires on residential properties start on patios, terraces, screened-in porches, or courtyards.

Photo of a mom cooking on a charcoal grill while her child plays outside the 3 foot safety zone.
Place your grill a safe distance from play areas and keep children away from the grill area by declaring a three-foot “safe zone.”

 

Grill Safety

 

  • Propane and charcoal BBQ grills must only be used outdoors. If used indoors, or in any enclosed spaces such as tents, they pose both a fire hazard and the risk of exposing occupants to toxic gases and potential asphyxiation.
  • Position the grill well away from siding, deck railing, and out from under eaves and overhanging branches.
  • Place the grill a safe distance from lawn games, play areas, and foot traffic.
  • Keep children and pets from the grill area: declare a three-foot “safe zone” around the grill.
  • Put out several long-handled grilling tools to give the chef plenty of clearance from heat and flames when cooking.
  • Periodically remove grease or fat buildup in trays below the grill so it cannot be ignited by a hot grill.

 

Charcoal Grills

 

  • Purchase the proper starter fluid and store out of reach of children and away from heat sources.
  • Never add charcoal starter fluid when coals or kindling have already been ignited, and never use any flammable or combustible liquid other than charcoal starter fluid to get the fire going.

 

Propane Grills

 

  • Check the propane cylinder hose for leaks before using it for the first time each year. A light soap and water solution applied to the hose will reveal escaping propane quickly by releasing bubbles.
  • If you determined your grill has a gas leak by smell or the soapy bubble test and there is no flame:
    1. Turn off the propane tank and grill.
    2. If the leak stops, get the grill serviced by a professional before using it again.
    3. If the leak does not stop, call the fire department.
  • If you smell gas while cooking, immediately get away from the grill and call the fire department. Do not attempt to move the grill.
  • All propane cylinders manufactured after April 2002 must have overfill protection devices (OPD). OPDs shut off the flow of propane before capacity is reached, limiting the potential for release of propane gas if the cylinder heats up. OPDs are easily identified by their triangular-shaped hand wheel.
  • Use only equipment bearing the mark of an independent testing laboratory. Follow the manufacturers’ instructions on how to set up the grill and maintain it.
  • Never store propane cylinders in buildings or garages. If you store a gas grill inside during the winter, disconnect the cylinder and leave it outside.

 

Fire Pits

 

In recent years, there has been a new concern for the Fire Service – fire pits. Fire pits are known to be a great source of warmth and ambience. But, with the popularity of fire pits increasing, fire safety has become even more important. There are many things you should consider while setting up and using a fire pit.

 

  • Keep away from flammable material and fluids such as gasoline, diesel fuel, kerosene, and charcoal lighter fluid or vehicles while in use.
  • Do not use flammable fluids such as gasoline, alcohol, diesel fuel, kerosene, and charcoal lighter fluid to light or relight fires.
  • Exercise the same precautions you would with an open fire.
  • Do not allow children to use the fire pit. Keep children and pets away.
  • Do not wear flammable or loose fitting clothing such as nylon.
  • Do not burn trash, leaves, paper, cardboard, or plywood. Avoid using soft wood such as pine or cedar that likely pop and throw sparks. Use of seasoned hardwood is suggested.
  • Before starting the fire, make sure that the lid will still close to extinguish the fire in case of emergency. Do not overload.
  • Before you light the fire, check the wind direction.
  • Keep a fire extinguisher or garden hose nearby.

 

Source: Fire Pits Helper

 

Campfires

 

First Aid for Burns

For minor burns, take the following action:

  • Cool the burn. Hold the burned area under cool (not cold) running water for 10 or 15 minutes or until the pain subsides. If this is impractical, immerse the burn in cool water or cool it with cold compresses. Cooling the burn reduces swelling by conducting heat away from the skin. Don’t put ice on the burn.
  • Cover the burn with a sterile gauze bandage. Don’t use fluffy cotton, or other material that may get lint in the wound. Wrap the gauze loosely to avoid putting pressure on burned skin. Bandaging keeps air off the burn reduces pain and protects blistered skin.
  • Take an over-the-counter pain reliever. These include aspirin, ibuprofen, naproxen or acetaminophen. Use caution when giving aspirin to children or teenagers. Though aspirin is approved for use in children older than 2, children and teenagers recovering from chickenpox or flu-like symptoms should never take aspirin.

Talk to a doctor if you have concerns.

Source: Mayo Clinic

 

When building a camp fire, follow these campfire safety tips from Smokey Bear:

 

How to Pick Your Spot

 

  • DO NOT build a fire at a site in hazardous, dry conditions. DO NOT build a fire if the campground, area, or event rules prohibit campfires.
  • FIND OUT if the campground has an existing fire ring or fire pit.
  • If there is not an existing fire pit, and pits are allowed, look for a site that is at least fifteen feet away from tent walls, shrubs, trees or other flammable objects. Also beware of low-hanging branches overhead.

 

Extinguishing Your Campfire

 

When you’re ready to put out your fire and call it a night, follow these guidelines:

 

  • Allow the wood to burn completely to ash, if possible.
  • Pour lots of water on the fire; drown all embers, not just the red ones.
  • Pour until hissing sound stops.
  • Stir the campfire ashes and embers with a shovel.
  • Scrape the sticks and logs to remove any embers.
  • Stir and make sure everything is wet and they are cold to the touch.
  • If you do not have water, use dirt. Mix enough dirt or sand with the embers. Continue adding and stirring until all material is cool. REMEMBER: do NOT bury the fire as the fire will continue to smolder and could catch roots on fire that will eventually get to the surface and start a wildfire.

 

REMEMBER: If it is too hot to touch, it’s too hot to leave!


Clothes Dryer Safety

Doing laundry is most likely part of your every day routine. But did you know how important taking care of your clothes dryer is to the safety of your home?  With a few simple safety tips you can help prevent a clothes dryer fire.

NFPA recommends the following:

  • Have your dryer installed by a professional
  • Do not use the dryer without a lint filter
  • Clean the lint filter before or after each load
  • Rigid or flexible metal venting material should be used to sustain proper air flow and drying time
  • Keep dryers in good working order. Gas dryers should be checked by a professional to make sure the gas line and connection are in tact and free of leaks
  • Follow manufacturer’s instructions and do not overload
  • Turn the dryer off when you leave the home or go to bed

Information compiled by Flourtown firefighter Jim Belcher via NFPA

Protect Your Family from Carbon Monoxide Poisoning

Safety Tips

  • Have your home heating systems (including chimneys and vents) inspected and serviced annually by a trained service technician.
  • Never use portable generators inside homes or garages, even if doors and windows are open. Use generators outside only, far away from the home.
  • Never bring a charcoal grill into the house for heating or cooking.  Do not barbeque in the garage.
  • Never use a gas range or oven for heating.
  • Open the fireplace damper before lighting a fire and keep it open until the ashes are cool.  An open damper may help prevent build-up of poisonous gases inside the home.
  • Install battery-operated CO alarms or CO alarms with battery backup in your home outside separate sleeping areas.
  • Know the symptoms of carbon monoxide poisoning: headache, dizziness, weakness, nausea, vomiting, sleepiness, and confusion.
  • If you suspect CO poisoning, get outside to fresh air immediately, and then call 911.

Know the Symptoms of CO Poisoning

  • Because CO is odorless, colorless, and otherwise undetectable to the human senses, people may not know that they are being exposed.  The initial symptoms of low to moderate CO poisoning are similar to the flu (but without the fever).  They include:
    • Headache
    • Fatigue
    • Shortness of breath
    • Nausea
    • Dizziness
  • High level CO poisoning results in progressively more severe symptoms, including:
    • Mental confusion
    • Vomiting
    • Loss of muscular coordination
    • Loss of consciousness
    • Ultimately death
  • Symptom severity is related to both the CO level and the duration of exposure.  For slowly developing residential CO problems, occupants and/or physicians can mistake mild to moderate CO poisoning symptoms for the flu, which sometimes results in tragic deaths.
  • For rapidly developing, high level CO exposures (e.g., associated with use of generators in residential spaces), victims can rapidly become mentally confused, and can lose muscle control without having first experienced milder symptoms; they will likely die if not rescued.

Cooking Safety

 Holiday and Everyday Cooking Safety Tips

From Don Konkle PFESI Executive Director

Cooking Fire Safety

Many families gather in the kitchen to spend time together, but it can be one of the most hazardous rooms in the house if you don’t practice safe cooking behaviors. Cooking equipment, most often a range or stovetop, is the leading cause of reported home fires and home fire injuries in the United States. Cooking equipment is also the leading cause of unreported fires and associated injuries.

Safe Cooking Behaviors
Product Safety Tip: Turkey Fryers
The delicious deep-fried turkey has quickly grown in popularity but safety experts are concerned that backyard chefs may be sacrificing fire safety for good taste.

Here’s why using a deep-fryer can be dangerous »

Radio on Fire Audio PSAs
This series addresses the top five fire-safety topics most frequently identified with home fire deaths: smoke alarms, escape plans, child fire safety, older adult fire safety (cooking and heating), and careless smoking.

It’s a recipe for serious injury or even death to wear loose clothing (especially hanging sleeves), walk away from a cooking pot on the stove, or leave flammable materials, such as potholders or paper towels, around the stove. Whether you are cooking the family holiday dinner or a snack for the children, practicing safe cooking behaviors will help keep you and your family safe.

Choose the Right Equipment and Use It Properly

  • Always use cooking equipment tested and approved by a recognized testing facility.
  • Follow manufacturers’ instructions and code requirements when installing and operating cooking equipment.
  • Plug microwave ovens and other cooking appliances directly into an outlet. Never use an extension cord for a cooking appliance, as it can overload the circuit and cause a fire.

Use Barbecue Grills Safely

  • Position the grill well away from siding, deck railings, and out from under eaves and overhanging branches.
  • Place the grill a safe distance from lawn games, play areas, and foot traffic.
  • Keep children and pets away from the grill area by declaring a 3-foot “kid-free zone” around the grill.
  • Put out several long-handled grilling tools to give the chef plenty of clearance from heat and flames when cooking food.
  • Periodically remove grease or fat buildup in trays below grill so it cannot be ignited by a hot grill.
  • Use only outdoors! If used indoors, or in any enclosed spaces, such as tents, barbecue grills pose both a fire hazard and the risk of exposing occupants to carbon monoxide.

Charcoal Grills

  • Purchase the proper starter fluid and store out of reach of children and away from heat sources.
  • Never add charcoal starter fluid when coals or kindling have already been ignited, and never use any flammable or combustible liquid other than charcoal starter fluid to get the fire going.

Propane Grills

  • Check the propane cylinder hose for leaks before using it for the first time each year. A light soap and water solution applied to the hose will reveal escaping propane quickly by releasing bubbles.
  • If you determined your grill has a gas leak by smell or the soapy bubble test and there is no flame:
    • Turn off the propane tank and grill.
    • If the leak stops, get the grill serviced by a professional before using it again.
    • If the leak does not stop, call the fire department.
  • If you smell gas while cooking, immediately get away from the grill and call the fire department. Do not attempt to move the grill.
  • All propane cylinders manufactured after April 2002 must have overfill protection devices (OPD). OPDs shut off the flow of propane before capacity is reached, limiting the potential for release of propane gas if the cylinder heats up. OPDs are easily identified by their triangular-shaped hand wheel.
  • Use only equipment bearing the mark of an independent testing laboratory. Follow the manufacturers’ instructions on how to set up the grill and maintain it.
  • Never store propane cylinders in buildings or garages. If you store a gas grill inside during the winter, disconnect the cylinder and leave it outside.

Watch What You Heat

  • The leading cause of fires in the kitchen is unattended cooking.
  • Stay in the kitchen when you are frying, grilling, or broiling food. If you leave the kitchen for even a short period of time, turn off the stove.
  • If you are simmering, baking, roasting, or boiling food, check it regularly, remain in the home while food is cooking, and use a timer to remind you that you’re cooking.
  • Stay alert! To prevent cooking fires, you have to be alert. You won’t be if you are sleepy, have been drinking alcohol, or have taken medicine that makes you drowsy.

Keep Things That Can Catch Fire and Heat Sources Apart

  • Keep anything that can catch fire – potholders, oven mitts, wooden utensils, paper or plastic bags, food packaging, towels, or curtains – away from your stovetop.
  • Keep the stovetop, burners, and oven clean.
  • Keep pets off cooking surfaces and nearby countertops to prevent them from knocking things onto the burner.
  • Wear short, close-fitting or tightly rolled sleeves when cooking. Loose clothing can dangle onto stove burners and catch fire if it comes into contact with a gas flame or electric burner.

If Your Clothes Catch Fire

If your clothes catch fire, stop, drop, and roll. Stop immediately, drop to the ground, and cover face with hands. Roll over and over or back and forth to put out the fire. Immediately cool the burn with cool water for 3 to 5 minutes and then seek emergency medical care.

Use Equipment for Intended Purposes Only
Cook only with equipment designed and intended for cooking, and heat your home only with equipment designed and intended for heating. There is additional danger of fire, injury, or death if equipment is used for a purpose for which it was not intended.

Protect Children from Scalds and Burns

  • Young children are at high risk of being burned by hot food and liquids. Keep children away from cooking areas by enforcing a “kid-free zone” of 3 feet (1 meter) around the stove.
  • Keep young children at least 3 feet (1 meter) away from any place where hot food or drink is being prepared or carried. Keep hot foods and liquids away from table and counter edges.
  • When young children are present, use the stove’s back burners whenever possible.
  • Never hold a child while cooking, drinking, or carrying hot foods or liquids.
  • Teach children that hot things burn.
  • When children are old enough, teach them to cook safely. Supervise them closely.

Prevent Scalds and Burns

  • To prevent spills due to overturn of appliances containing hot food or liquids, use the back burner when possible and/or turn pot handles away from the stove’s edge. All appliance cords need to be kept coiled and away from counter edges.
  • Use oven mitts or potholders when moving hot food from ovens, microwave ovens, or stovetops. Never use wet oven mitts or potholders as they can cause scald burns.
  • Replace old or worn oven mitts.
  • Treat a burn right away, putting it in cool water. Cool the burn for 3 to 5 minutes. If the burn is bigger than your fist or if you have any questions about how to treat it, seek medical attention right away.

Install and Use Microwave Ovens Safely

  • Place or install the microwave oven at a safe height, within easy reach of all users. The face of the person using the microwave oven should always be higher than the front of the microwave oven door. This is to prevent hot food or liquid from spilling onto a user’s face or body from above and to prevent the microwave oven itself from falling onto a user.
  • Never use aluminum foil or metal objects in a microwave oven. They can cause a fire and damage the oven.
  • Heat food only in containers or dishes that are safe for microwave use.
  • Open heated food containers slowly away from the face to avoid steam burns. Hot steam escaping from the container or food can cause burns.
  • Foods heat unevenly in microwave ovens. Stir and test before eating.

How and When to Fight Cooking Fires

  • When in doubt, just get out. When you leave, close the door behind you to help contain the fire. Call 9-1-1 or the local emergency number after you leave.
  • If you do try to fight the fire, be sure others are already getting out and you have a clear path to the exit.
  • Always keep an oven mitt and a lid nearby when you are cooking. If a small grease fire starts in a pan, smother the flames by carefully sliding the lid over the pan (make sure you are wearing the oven mitt). Turn off the burner. Do not move the pan. To keep the fire from restarting, leave the lid on until the pan is completely cool.
  • In case of an oven fire, turn off the heat and keep the door closed to prevent flames from burning you or your clothing.
  • If you have a fire in your microwave oven, turn it off immediately and keep the door closed. Never open the door until the fire is completely out. Unplug the appliance if you can safely reach the outlet.
  • After a fire, both ovens and microwaves should be checked and/or serviced before being used again.

Nuisance Smoke Alarms

  • Move smoke alarms farther away from kitchens according to manufacturers’ instructions and/or install a smoke alarm with a pause button.
  • If a smoke alarm sounds during normal cooking, press the pause button if the smoke alarm has one. Open the door or window or fan the area with a towel to get the air moving. Do not disable the smoke alarm or take out the batteries.
  • Treat every smoke alarm activation as a likely fire and react quickly and safely to the alarm.

Thanksgiving Fire Safety Tips

The kitchen is the heart of the home especially at Thanksgiving. Safety in the kitchen is important, especially on Thanksgiving Day when there is a lot of activity and people at home.

Here are some general safety tips

  • Stay in the kitchen when you are cooking on the stovetop so you can keep an eye on the food
  • Stay in the home when cooking your turkey and check on it frequently
  • Keep children away from the stove. The stove will be hot and children should be 3 feet away
  • Make sure kids stay away from hot foods and liquids. The steam, or splash from vegetables, gravy or coffee could cause serious burns
  • Keep knives out of reach of children
  • Be sure electric cords from an electric knife, coffee maker, plate warmer or mixer are not dangling off the counter within easy reach of a child
  • Keep matches and utility lighters out of reach of children – up high in a locked cabinet
  • Never leave children alone in a room with a lit candle
  • Make sure your smoke alarms are working. Test them by pushing the “Test” button on the detector
  •  Have activities outside that keep kids out of the kitchen during these busy times. Games, puzzles or books can keep them busy.

Happy Thanksgiving

Information compiled by Firefighter Jim Belcher via NFPA

Fire Prevention Open House 2011 – Thank You

Thanks to all who came out Fire Prevention Open House 2011! We had large crowds of enthusiastic children and families all eager to learn about fire prevention, escape plans, smoke and CO detectors and, of course, Scooby Doo! All the trucks were on display and thanks to Sprinkles Ice Cream and Water Ice for supplying a cool treat. Lt. John Redington sweated it out over a hot (and sometimes out of control) stove, but offered valuable lessons on how to deal with grease fires. Thanks go out to Gene Rahill, Jim Belcher and Marcia Thompson who lead our Open House activities and all the public for coming out to support our efforts.

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